Small Groups and the Transformed Life

Small Groups and the Transformed Life

Ed Stetzer:

Second, smaller communities act more like, well, communities.

That may seem like a given, but the bigger the group is, the less like community it feels. The kind of community I am advocating requires a level of intimacy easily lost as numbers grow.
You simply cannot know everyone beyond a certain point, and you certainly will not open up about your struggles and sins in a large group of people you don’t know.

Third, small groups deliver deeper friendships that double as accountability.

When people know you—really know you—your life becomes far more transparent, including your sin, struggles, successes, and more. Others learn to read you and will call you out for those sins, encourage you through those struggles, and rejoice with you in those successes. This is part of what we should expect from good friends—and groups create friends.

This is why I’ve always recommended that discipleship groups are no more than 3-5 people.

Robby Gallaty is the Senior Pastor of Long Hollow Baptist Church in Hendersonville, TN. He was radically saved out of a life of drug addiction on November 12, 2002. In 2008, he began Replicate Ministries to equip and train men and women to be disciples who make disciples. He is also the author of Growing Up: How to Be a Disciple Who Makes Disciples (2013), Firmly Planted: How to Cultivate a Faith Rooted in Christ (2015), Rediscovering Discipleship: Making Jesus’ Final Words Our First Work (2015), Foundations: A 260-Day Bible Reading Plan for Busy Believers (2015), and The Forgotten Jesus: How Western Christians Should Follow an Eastern Rabbi (2017).